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How To Hit A SHORT ANGLE Forehand

October 18, 2019


14 Comments

  • Reply George Oberlander June 5, 2019 at 7:35 pm

    Good points about the difficulty many players have in moving quickly diagonally forward and the under use of the short angle forehand. Although you mention getting a good wrist rotation, I think it might be useful to emphasize that heavy topspin is usually needed as the ball will be traveling over the higher portion of the net and having less less depth to land in play.
    For me, personally, trying to hit on the outside of the ball work better in directing my groundstrokes cross court. I find it easier to focus on a part of the ball rather than imagining a diagonal line for my racquet path.
    Keep up the good work guys!

  • Reply alfprieto June 5, 2019 at 8:57 pm

    Thank you guys. But please. Show more examples. I just saw one shot

  • Reply PlayYourCourt.com June 5, 2019 at 9:21 pm

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  • Reply Matthew Park June 5, 2019 at 9:26 pm

    Former Div. II tennis guy here. sharp angle cross court forehand is something you hit if you can toy with your opponent. (this was the case for me anyway.) If the angle is not sharp enough, you become a sitting duck. If the shot sails just a little, it goes out.

    I am not opposed to sharp angle forehand. I just think that a disclaimer should have been provided explaining the risk & pitfall of this shot.

  • Reply Matthew Park June 5, 2019 at 10:05 pm

    Scott & Nathan, I sincerely hope you guys do a video on the IMPORTANCE of second serve. My 14yr. old son & his friend (they are getting ready for a jr. doubles tournament) completely destroyed two very athletic grown-ups yesterday.

    ground strokes were evenly matched. volley: no match. grown-ups were way better. first serve: no match. grown-ups were hitting lethal (I would say near or even over 100mph) first serves. While my son is already 6'1'' & he has really long arms, his first serve only clocks in at about 85 -90mph. tennis IQ & movement/footwork: no match. all in favor of grown-ups.

    Yet, these two grown-ups, (very fine tennis players I may add) only managed to win 2 games because both of their second serves were underwhelming. (honestly, they were lucky to even win 2 games.) my son and his friend were putting away second serves at will even though they were playing doubles.

    In defense of these two fine grown-ups, at least they had "proper" topspin second serves. but they were going in so weak that they were nothing more than easy target practice for my son & his friend.

    I would say I see this in over 95% of all club matches being played now days. Have tennis coaches forgotten about the importance of second serve? This is like 95% of basketball players not knowing how to make free throws.

    I can't understand what caused this phenomenon/plague but this is what I see in almost every club level matches now days.

    Please fix this for the love of tennis!!!

  • Reply Bharat Awasthi June 5, 2019 at 10:27 pm

    What does breaking the wrist means?

  • Reply Kazzzzzo June 6, 2019 at 9:56 am

    And also trying to hit a ball more on the outside.

  • Reply Michael Robinson June 6, 2019 at 11:07 am

    You really need to show more shots! Preferably start the video with some examples of what you're trying to teach, that way we can see whether the lesson is appropriate to us. I also don't understand why you have your own player rating system – does it add something that the existing rating systems don't have?

  • Reply Daniel Kristianto June 6, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    More examples please. Just 1 is not enough for study… Thank you

  • Reply Frank Kuo June 7, 2019 at 6:43 pm

    Nice videos. Who is Michael Chang?

  • Reply meggieturi June 9, 2019 at 4:19 pm

    Too much yakking. Not enough instruction.

  • Reply todd preisler June 10, 2019 at 4:43 pm

    When Novak hits this shot his follow thru is usually a buggy whip type follow thru, Federer as well. Thoughts?

  • Reply poida smith June 22, 2019 at 4:14 pm

    Extending the racket to the target, up a staircase etc. is 1970's coaching methodology. Top players simply don't do that and haven't for a long time.

  • Reply Newton Kwan August 21, 2019 at 9:07 pm

    Mostly just talking, one brief example no slow mo and is not even a short angle ….?

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